sedges at the lake

Baumea articulata grows at Lake Gwelup

Baumea articulata is endemic to Perth and grows at Lake Gwelup.

Baumea articulata at Lake Gwelup


The more common Typha orientalis (bulrush) is an introduced species (from eastern and northern Australia) and is taking over from naturally occurring plants. Typha was removed from this area near the boardwalk (foreground). Not all the plants are removed at once (background) because water birds use the shelter for nesting, roosting and habitat [1].

Typha orientalis removed near the boardwalk

Eradication is difficult due to high seed production and rhizomatous root systems. [2] On the opposite side of the lake Typha is slashed and a targeted herbicide applied (glyphosate registered for aquatic situations*).

Typha orientalis slashed and targeted herbicide applied

The red marking dye shows where herbicide was applied (only to individual slashed stalks to be absorbed through the leaves and kill the root system). Baumea articulata plants (left) were avoided. The lone Typha shoot (centre) grew since herbicide application from the soil seed bank or the extensive root system. This is why treatment needs to be repeated annually. [1]

Typha orientalis slashed and targeted herbicide applied

Endemic sedges are planted where Typha previously grew. Two years ago Baumea articulata was planted along this fence line.

Baumea articulata along the fenceline

Baumea articulata soon after planting in April 2014.

newly planted Baumea articulata

This area is flooded by winter rains and the plants stand in water in the latter part of the year. The opposite side of the inundated fence line in December 2014.

Baumea articulata December 2014

Perth’s harsh climate means many plants die in revegetation projects. Few plants made it to maturity, but the ones that did are growing well and flowered over summer.

Baumea articulata along the fenceline in March 2016

spent Baumea articulata flower from last year

Baumea articulata flower

In the last few weeks the fence line has been moved to protect these paperbarks (Melaleuca rhaphiophylla) and another planting of sedges.

new fence line with paperbarks

The fencing continues along the open section which floods in winter, to protect the new plants.

fencing continues to protect the new plants

Newly planted sedges are currently far from the water. This area will be waterlogged throughout winter and spring as the waters rise.

newly planted Baumea articulata

Looking back towards the older planting across the newly planted sedges.

looking back towards the older planting across the newly planted sedges

The same view a month ago before the fence line was moved, March 2016.

Baumea articulata along the fenceline in March 2016

=^.^=

*Some preparations of glyphosate are harmful to fish and other aquatic life, due to the surfactant. [3] Roundup Bioactive is registered for use near water because it does not contain that surfactant. [4]

References

  1. Brown & Bettink (2015) Typha orientalis: Management Notes (for the Swan NRM Region) Perth, WA: Florabase.
  2. Moore & Wheeler (2008) Southern Weeds and their Control (2nd ed.) Perth, WA: Dept. of Agriculture.
  3. Scotts Australia (2012) Defender Glyphosate 360 Weed Control MSDS No. 190400.
  4. Brown & Brooks (2002) Bushland Weeds: A Practical Guide to their Management Perth, WA: Environmental Weeds Action Network.

Baumea articulata at Lake Gwelup

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